picture of György Gattyán

RTL Híradó took a look at the political movement that wealthy businessman György Gattyán (pictured) has supposedly set up to run in the Parliamentary elections next spring, but found no sign that the new party had been registered anywhere.

As reported yesterday, the tech entrepreneur announced a bid for office next year with a newly-founded party, the Solution Movement. Gattyán, reportedly the third richest man in Hungary, announced his intentions in an interview with ATV’s Egyenes Beszéd on Friday.

RTL Híradó was informed in writing on Saturday that the movement had been registered in November.

The Solution Movement has activists and supporters, but is not functioning as a party yet.

-stated the movement’s representatives, who also claimed that their supporters were growing day by day.

But RTL found that the movement still has no website and that there was no trace of the new party in the official court register.

In his Egyenes Beszéd interview, Gattyán said that he was not looking to take on the role of prime minister, but if it happens, he’ll do it for the shortest time possible.

Gattyán added that the goal was a change of government, but did not feel that the opposition coalition was strong enough to do this on its own. He believes, however, that they could succeed together with him.

On ATV, Budapest Mayor Gergely Karácsony reacted to Gattyán’s news and that of former Jobbik member Andrea Varga-Damm’s announcement that she was running for prime minister with her Reformers party.

These efforts are desperate attempts by Fidesz to divide those who want change. These people are Fidesz mercenaries and I don’t think that they will have any influence on the result in any way.

-said Gergely Karácsony.

Péter Márki-Zay also previously said to RTL Híradó that it was in Fidesz’s interest for the billionaire to run for office in next year’s Parliamentary elections.

[Magyar Hang]

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By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.