picture of Anna Donáth

The new president of Momentum does not want the opposition’s joint campaign to incite anger or hate, nor does she agree with Péter Márki-Zay’s migrant counter billboard, because “sometimes you have to draw a red line.” In an interview with Telex, Anna Donáth also mentioned that she does not plan to quit her current role as MEP but would lead the party half the time from Brussels, and that it is time to shake up the party, as well as the opposition’s campaign.

After assuming the post on Sunday, Anna Donáth’s new mandate as party president will only last until next summer. But because she has a “vision” of where to take Hungary and Momentum, she said that she had not yet ruled out the possibility of running for the position again.

In the meantime, “there’s no question we need to change the government in 2022,” she said, because “the primary elections and the success of Péter Márki-Zay show that people need a new impetus and new faces.” However, until the change of government occurs, “there is still a lot of work to be done and a lot of steps that have to be taken.”

Regarding the joint campaign of the opposition parties, Donáth said, “I really don’t want the joint campaign to be based on inciting anger and hatred.” On this point, the Momentum President also criticized the recent migrant counter billboard stunt put on by opposition prime minister-designate Péter Márki-Zay: “I think it is a mistake to wage war using Fidesz’s phrasing and enemy images instead of talking about real problems.”

“Momentum will not assist in providing the backbone of the campaign with an issue that it cannot identify with and that goes against what we have promised our voters so far.”

She also offered some pointed criticism of the recent behavior of some of her fellow opposition politicans. “Many of them have taken it easy after the primaries. The opposition has thrown the past month out the window,” stated Anna Donáth.

[HVG]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.