picture of Závecz Reseach logo

The united opposition parties continue to lead the ruling Fidesz-KDNP coalition in public support by 4%, according to a new Závecz Research survey commissioned by the LMP-associated Ökopolisz Foundation that polled 2,000 people and was carried out between November 2-12.

A previous Závecz poll had also showed a 4% lead for the opposition’s joint list over the government parties in October, and their latest poll indicates that this situation did not change in November.

According to data in the new poll, voter turnout would be 72% if the Parliamentary elections were held now, with 37% voting for Fidesz-KDNP and 41% for the opposition list. In both cases, there was an increase of 2 percentage points compared to the October figures, which puts the government parties back to their previous level of support in September.

In addition, 3% of respondents would vote for the Hungarian Two-Tailed Dog Party (MKKP) and the Our Country Movement (Mi Hazánk). 2% of them would cast a vote for someone else, while 14% are not sure who they would vote for.

The poll also revealed that although the opposition appears to be ahead in popularity, 45% of those polled believe Fidesz-KDNP would win the elections and only 40% think the opposition will come out on top.

Looking at support by individual party, 37% of respondents supported Fidesz-KDNP, while DK was second at 18%. After these two, Jobbik was third at 6%, Momentum had 5%, while the Hungarian Socialist Party (MSZP), MKKP, and Mi Hazánk all stood at 4%. Rounding out the list, LMP’s support was at 3% while only 2% said they supported Párbeszéd.

In addition to questions on parties and individual politicians, the poll also asked questions about support for environmental issues. Among other results, it turned out that there was widespread support for a shift to renewable energy instead of expanding the Paks nuclear power plant, and that three-quarters of people believe that the government should have a separate Green and Climate Change Ministry.

[Telex]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.