picture of Fidesz party congress 2021

Index takes a look at some responses from the political opposition to the 29th Fidesz Party Congress held on Sunday, starting with an ironic post by Ákos Hadházy on Facebook.

Captioning a photo, the independent MP wrote, “An exciting day, today is the Fidesz Congress. I wonder whether they’ll re-elect the Boss?” The photo Hadházy chose above the caption appeared to be one of a similar party rally in North Korea.

Hadházy can rest easy, the news source reassured him, as the party chose to re-elect Viktor Orbán as its leader after he received 1,061 votes.

For Budapest Mayor Gergely Karácsony, the party congress reminded him of the Communist era under former dictator János Kádár.

“Now seriously,” the mayor wrote on social media, “How is a Fidesz congress is any different from a [former Hungarian Communist Party] MSZMP convention if the chief is re-elected without a candidate, they reprimand the West and the subversive opposition, and a district council head says they are still waiting for answers to unpleasant questions from party headquarters?”

Independent Representative Bernadett Szél found it hard to believe that Deputy Prime Minister Zsolt Semjén could praise the Prime Minister for his management of the epidemic in Hungary, believing he showed the opposite example.

Szél claimed that had she been at the head of governmenet during the pandemic, Hungary wouldn’t have been a world leader in deaths, thousands of incapacitated patients would not have been ejected from hospitals overnight, and testing would have been widespread and free of charge, among other charges.

Tímea Szabó, co-chair of Párbeszéd who was one of the opposition leaders in the fight against building a campus of China’s Fudan University in Hungary, commented unfavorably on Viktor Orbán’s statement that Hungary will no longer be a colony, and that Fidesz will unite the nation.

Szabó noted that Orbán had agreed to a 450 billion Ft. (US $1.40 billion) loan from the Chinese Communist Party to build the Fudan campus in Budapest, which would make the country into a Chinese colony.

[Index]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.