picture of Fidesz congress 2021

“We give and receive blows, but when we get them, it doesn’t always hurt us the most,” began Prime Minister Viktor Orbán in his speech to the 29th Fidesz Congress, which re-elected the Hungarian Prime Minister as its party chair.

The new generation of the party has grown up and arrived, said Orbán, mentioning government ministers Péter Szijjártó, Judit Varga, and Gergely Gulyás, as well as Székesfehérvár Mayor András Cser-Palkovics.

Orbán then said he had accepted another term as party chair because he was “at his best age,” and that his 33-year career in the role thus far was “just a warm-up.”

Fidesz has remained true to itself for decades, stated Orbán, and as a result Hungarians rewarded the party by bringing it to power more times than any other party in recent history. Because of this, Orbán said that “he will do this as long as he can handle it.”

Orbán stated that Fidesz had achieved all of the goals the party set in 2010, when it came to power for the second time after its first term in government between 1998-2002. The Prime Minister noted among other things the creation of one million jobs, putting a focus on families, and protecting pensions, athough he did not elaborate on how these were achieved.

The left and the liberals, on the other hand, are lazy and unable to show any serious achievement, according to Orbán, and their activities are only about telling others how they should live.

Viktor Orbán also spoke about how he believes the Western world is losing out in global competition, a challenge to which Hungarians must also adapt. He said that Hungary needed Korean, Chinese and Turkish schools because these countries will be the dominant nations in the world economy.

Turning to the 2022 parliamentary elections, Orbán said that Fidesz had become an unavoidable political force, which he claims “the post-communists had a chance to do,” but were not able to seize the opportunity. Fidesz has achieved this, he said, because the party has a strong, unified vision.

“The question is whether the social majority behind us will become an electoral majority,” he continued, concluding his speech by calling the election “a fight against Brussels and George Soros.”

[Azonnali][Photo: Viktor Orbán / Facebook]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.