picture of the Curia

The Curia, Hungary’s High Court, has ruled in favor of two more questions submitted by the government to appear on a proposed referendum after approving one other question a few days ago, reports Népszava.

Upholding an earlier decision by the National Election Commission (NVB), the court approved of the following questions for the national referendum:

Do you support holding sessions on sexual orientation for minor children in public education institutions without parental consent?

Do you support the unrestricted depiction of sexual-themed media content to minors that affect their development?

Both rulings by the Curia are final, and cannot be appealed.

With these judgments, the Curia has now ruled on four out of five referendum questions proposed by the government. On Monday, the High Court approved of the question, “Do you support the promotion of gender reassignment treatments for minor children?”

However, the Curia had previously rejected the wording of the fourth question, “Do you support making gender reassignment treatments available for minor children?” Last week, the government attacked this decision and has turned to the Constitutional Court for remedy, claiming that the ruling violates its right to a fair trial enshrined in the Fundamental Law.

Prime Minister Orbán announced in July that the government would be initiating a “child protection” referendum consisting of five questions. The NVB certified all five questions for the referendum, but they were later challenged in court by organizations and private persons and headed to the Curia for final approval.

There is now only one question remaining for the High Court to decide on: “Do you support the display of media content showing gender reassignment to minors?”

In addition, Parliament recently changed election rules so that referendums may now be held on the same day as Parliamentary, municipal, or European elections, so there is a strong chance that voters will get to have a say at the same time in both the government’s referendum and who they want to send to Parliament next spring.

[Népszava]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.