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Multiple Hungarian Locales Cancelling Aug. 20 Fireworks Over Budget Woes

Joining several other towns, the northeastern city of Miskolc will not be shooting off fireworks on August 20, Miskolc Mayor Pál Veres announced on Wednesday evening.

Veres argued that spending public money on the traditional fireworks display on Hungary’s national holiday would be an indefensible and irresponsible waste due to the country’s current unpredictable financial situation.

The city now intends to spend the money set aside for the display on items “that truly serve the people of Miskolc and their interests in this extremely difficult situation.”

Miskolc follows Salgótarján, Siófok, Pécs, and Sümeg as the fifth city that has decided to call off its August 20 fireworks display.

But whereas the first four settlements are led by Hungary’s political opposition, Veszprém County’s Sümeg has a Fidesz mayor and a pro-government majority in its local representative body.

It is not yet known, writes Magyar Narancs, whether Mayor László Végh will face retribution from his party for this act, or whether other Fidesz-led towns will follow Sümeg in cancelling their annual fireworks display. [444, Magyar Narancs]

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3 Comments

  1. Misi bacsi

    I have been busy with family and friends in Hungary, so I have not had time to comment. Nevertheless, I find your daily reporting useful, especially as you regularly present facts vs. the usual regime propaganda. Paranoid conspiracies have replaced more rational discourse, which is also true in other parts of the world. I think liberal democracies are at great risk, but most have managed-so far- to escape the worst outcomes. Sinclair Lewis in one of his less memorable novels, “ It Can’t Happen Here” wrote about the possible election of a fascist regime in the US. Although written in the 1930s, this novel is as relevant today as back at that time. Thanks for your efforts.. I am certain you are providing useful,information to various decision makers. At age 75, I have sadly lived long enough to see the flaws of the myth of inevitable progress, but I remain optimistic.

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