picture of a press conference

The united opposition announced its social policy platform at a press conference Monday, stating that it would increase family benefits, launch a social rental housing program, and stop evicting homeowners who have foreign currency-backed mortgages.

“Viktor Orbán’s economic and social policy has failed,” said Máté Kanász-Nagy (pictured, left), co-chair of opposition party LMP and spokesman for social issues in Péter Márki-Zay’s shadow government, at a press conference on Monday. As he stated, inflation is sky-high, social inequality is out of control, and poverty continues to get more entrenched.

András Jámbor, the united opposition’s candidate in the Ferencváros district of Budapest (pictured, middle), also spoke at the press conference. Jámbor spoke of a housing crisis in the capital, but said that the government ended the only major housing project currently under consideration, Student City, and “in its place it wants to put a private Chinese university that is indebted to one country.”

Jámbor emphasized that 62% of those aged 18-34 live with their parents, and 70% of Hungarians aged 25-34 who live a parent work full-time, but are unable to live independently from them.

If the opposition can form a government in next year’s elections, Jámbor promised that they would support the renovation of municipal and social rental housing. The new government would also set up a housing subsidy system, provide aid for expanding the apartment benefit system, and relaunch the housing savings fund program, among other initiatives.

Following Jámbor, Lajos Kórozs (pictured, right) talked about their intentions of reinstituting crisis relief funds back with local governments. The Socialist MP promised that the new government would “raise the salaries of social workers by 50%, as well as increase the number of home health care hours and range of services.”

[HVG][Photo: András Jámbor / Facebook]

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By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.