picture of János Pócs

“Everyone will get a gift, and some children who win a drawing will even have their dreams will come true,” said János Pócs in a video shared on social media. “Santa lovingly awaits your letters, as do I,” he stated.

The Fidesz MP is again asking children in his constituency to write their wishes to Santa in a letter and “personally place them in the Christmas mailbox located at the Representative’s Office.” Pócs promises that his co-workers will forward the letters to Santa, who will reward the little ones with chocolate Santas to express his gratitude.

The festive politician told tabloid Blikk that he just wanted good things for children, that they should feel like kids for as long as possible in this hectic world, and for them to keep their faith.

As to why children have to go to directly to his office, Pócs replied, “I am a Member of Parliament for Jászság, and the Christmas mailbox will be placed on the wall of the Parliamentary Office, which is in a public area, as is its mailbox. Most of the time I’m here too.”

The drawing is scheduled to take place in a live video with Santa, and in addition to getting a chocolate Santa, every child who writes a letter to the MP will also receive a “Santa Claus package” on the evening of December 5th. János Pócs personally delivered gifts to his constituents last year, when he showed up at residences with gifts as Santa’s “assistant.”

Blikk noted that it had pratically become a tradition towards the end of the year for politicians to visit children, give them gifts, and take photos with them. They then upload these pictures to their Facebook pages, reinforcing the obvious suspicion of the children being used for campaign purposes.

Political scientist Richárd Szentpéteri Nagy told the paper that such activities are clearly done for political purposes, and that children should not be involved in them. “There’s no way to do this well. Politicians have nothing to do with Santa Claus,” he commented.

[Népszava][Photo: János Pócs / Facebook]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.