picture of Gergely Gulyás

The government is implementing new indoor mask mandates to combat the spread of coronavirus in Hungary, reports Telex via news agency MTI.

Facemasks will have to be worn indoors starting this Saturday, except for offices and sports halls, announced Minister Gergely Gulyás (pictured) at the Government Information session on Thursday. A vaccination card will be required for attending larger events, and a vaccine booster shot will be mandatory for health professionals.

Details of the epidemiological measures have already been published in the Official Gazette. The main provisions of these measures include:

  • From Saturday, masks must be worn in shops, malls, post offices, customer service areas, theaters, cinemas, museums, and sporting events.
  • Employees working at indoor cultural and other events, as well as in gyms, swimming pools, spas, and the hospitality industry must also wear a mask.
  • In nurseries, kindergartens, and schools, employers can determine their own individual rules for employees as well as for school principals and rectors in higher education institutions. “Everyone has the right to use a facemask, and no one can be prohibited from mask usage,” states the decree.
  • For religious services, each individual community can decide on their own rules for facemask usage.
  • To protect healthcare workers and patients and to ensure the smooth operation of patient care, healthcare workers will be required to get a third booster dose by December 10, provided that 180 days have elapsed since their previous vaccination.
  • A medical worker may not terminate their employment while under the current state of emergency.
  • Furthermore, a third vaccination is mandatory for those employed in the Prime Minister’s Office and cabinet. In other ministries, the relevant Minister may decree that a booster shot be mandatory for employees working there.

[Telex]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.