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31 key gov’t positions will be immovable after elections, says Hungarian Helsinki Committee

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How long will current public service officials be able to stay in office for? The Hungarian Helsinki Committee looked into the answer to this question, but the results were not very encouraging for Hungary’s political opposition.

As the group wrote on Facebook:

Even in the event of an opposition victory, a year after the election, apart from the prime minister 31 of the 32 leaders of the most important state bodies will remain the same as they are now. They are well-bolted into their velvet chairs.

These include the heads of key government agencies, such as the State Audit Office, the Budget Council, the Curia High Court, the Prosecutor’s Office, the National Judicial Office, and the Media Council.

Many public office holders who are difficult to remove and who had received their mandates exclusively from the current government or Fidesz’s parliamentary majority will retain their positions after the elections, regardless of their outcome.

-said the human rights NGO.

Because of this, even if the government is replaced after the elections, it can be expected that these officials will attempt to subvert the efforts of the new government through overt or more subtle means related to their position.

The group has posted an informative infographic and description on this topic in English as well.

[Magyar Hang][Image: cementezettek.helsinki.hu/en/]

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2 Comments

  1. Misi bacsi

    One of the most important short posts I have read. Even if the opposition “defeats”the regime, the fidesz moles will remain. Gives new meaning to the word, subversion. (No skiing g today as all my friends have Covid, but at least I have more time to read and comment)

    • Steven

      Yes it’s good to remember that power resides in more than just Parliament and the courts – the vast bureaucracy also wields a lot of power to enact or frustrate the agenda of elected officials.

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