picture of Péter Jakab

Jobbik President Péter Jakab offered some criticism of the opposition’s candidate for prime minister, Péter Márki-Zay, saying that he lacks the ability to compromise and that he needs to stop commenting on the private lives of others.

In an interview with Rita Benyó from Jelen, Jakab said that he likes it when someone is outspoken and not politically correct, and believes he is similar to the mayor of Hódmezővásárhely in this respect.

“Where we differ is in our willingness to compromise. I think he has yet to learn that,” said Jakab, who competed against Márki-Zay during the recently-concluded primary elections.

Jakab claims he never wanted to be prime minister. When he first thought about who might make an ideal candidate for the job, Péter Márki-Zay came to mind, as he said it should be “a civilian who stands above the parties, perhaps because that person will be able to embody the will of the electorate in the most integrative sense.”

The president of Jobbik also said the Hódmezővásárhely mayor approached him last December and asked for the backing of his party. However, Jakab said that Márki-Zay’s lack of willingness to compromise was noticeable at the meeting.

“It was then that I decided I was going to run for prime minister, because this six-party crowd can only be held together by someone who is extremely willing to compromise. I did not see this competence in Péter,” he said.

Péter Jakab also expressed displeasure with Márki-Zay’s comments on the alleged sexual orientation of the Prime Minister’s son, Gáspár Orbán, as he feels that one’s private life is sacred and inviolable.

“I don’t care what his sexual affiliation is. I don’t care that he’s a public figure either. It’s his private affair, and I don’t want to make it a part of public life,” he said. “We have to be better than Fidesz.”

The Jobbik President also said that he did not ask for a vote of confidence in his party after losing the primary elections, and that he would run for party chair again next summer.

You can watch the full interview (in Hungarian) here.

[Telex]

By Steven N.

Steven is the editor-in-chief of Hungarian Politics. He has been following the political scene in Hungary and the Central European region more or less since 1994.